ezibota:



Introducing “Come and Go: Immigration Issues”
In addition to providing an interactive platform to realize a connected and empowered global African community, Ezibota will also be introducing a series of new columns for our members and visitors to read, ponder, and discuss. The first of our columns is titled “Come and Go: Immigration Issues,” a column dedicated to exploring issues in black immigration on a global scale.
The purpose of this column is to create a space where we can examine the African immigrant in a global, shifting world; to explore the different issues that African immigrants face whether they are documented or undocumented. This column will address immigrant rights, movement building, and solidarity amongst various immigrant groups.
The author behind this column, Alfresco Ruwe, is originally from Zambia and currently resides in Austin, Texas in pursuit of his Master’s degree in Philosophy. Join Alfresco and guest contributors on our platform for monthly discussion focusing on black immigration and the various realities African immigrants face on a daily basis, throughout the world.
Read more about our new column “Come and Go: Immigration Issues” on Ezibota.com
Connect with us: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google + | Youtube

ezibota:

Introducing “Come and Go: Immigration Issues”

In addition to providing an interactive platform to realize a connected and empowered global African community, Ezibota will also be introducing a series of new columns for our members and visitors to read, ponder, and discuss. The first of our columns is titled “Come and Go: Immigration Issues,” a column dedicated to exploring issues in black immigration on a global scale.

The purpose of this column is to create a space where we can examine the African immigrant in a global, shifting world; to explore the different issues that African immigrants face whether they are documented or undocumented. This column will address immigrant rights, movement building, and solidarity amongst various immigrant groups.

The author behind this column, Alfresco Ruwe, is originally from Zambia and currently resides in Austin, Texas in pursuit of his Master’s degree in Philosophy. Join Alfresco and guest contributors on our platform for monthly discussion focusing on black immigration and the various realities African immigrants face on a daily basis, throughout the world.

Read more about our new column “Come and Go: Immigration Issues” on Ezibota.com

Connect with us: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Google + | Youtube

Divergent:

ubu507:

on the verge

of a dirge

imnot12:

i have no reason to love october this much
but still
it’s a very selfless love

imnot12:

i have no reason to love october this much

but still

it’s a very selfless love

brucesterling:

*Martian spacecraft staffers at Indian space control, September 2014

brucesterling:

*Martian spacecraft staffers at Indian space control, September 2014

africaisdonesuffering:

africaisdonesuffering:


"True Africans" Community Chat
How do you know you are African? What factors are necessary for you to consider others African? What defines an African? Who defines an African? Rise Africa community members discuss these questions and more.

Thank you to all who joined our live stream yesterday on defining the African identity. To those who missed it, here it is.

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.

We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.

We welcome you to become a member and join this international network to connect with other young people using their skills, interests, and voices to diversify the African narrative.

(Source: ezibota, via ezibota)

"

Today, I have a better understanding of the relations between Africans and African-Americans. I respect their experiences and deeply hope that they respect mine as well. My acceptance of being ‘black in America’ comes from the understanding that despite our different experiences, we are all battling the same systems of oppression, and that Africa is the birthplace of the different cultures existing within the African Diaspora.

I think more Africans need to learn more about African-American culture. I always say that if it had not been for their protests and revolution, first generation Africans would have an entirely different existence in America. In reciprocity, I think what Africans need from African-Americans is an acceptance of our experiences – neither a mockery of them nor alienation.

There are differences, but these differences are only as poignant as we make them, and in many ways, they’re what show the strength of our African ancestors, the power behind our cultures and the everlasting legacy of the Diaspora spread all across the world

"

Deborah Fremprong; Africa-African American (via africaisdonesuffering)

The Best of Rise Africa: From September 15th – September 21st we will be celebrating the most popular and appreciated posts that Rise Africa produced.

We’re still working tirelessly on our new platform, Ezibota.com, and developing the many resources and benefits that will be made available to our community through our new membership system, but we dedicate this week to appreciating the great content and conversations we enjoyed through Rise Africa and our collective community.

Join our mailing list for community updates, discounted membership plans, and sneak peeks of the services offered on our new platform. 

(via africaisdonesuffering)

(Source: ezibota, via ezibota)

From Timbuktu Chronicles:

Global beauty ambassador Eryca Freemantle talks about: how the international make-up brands are investing in Africa; why women of color spend more on beauty products than their white counterparts; the kinds of beauty products the international brands have for women of colour; local beauty brands in Nigeria; and the massive interest from Nigeria in a competition for hairdressers and make-up artists.

privacyandtechnology:

From the blog post:

"Their argument: Since the tech industry is populated by meritocratic rationalists, it would be impossible for a talented female engineer not to rise to the top. Therefore, if few women are in the industry, the problem is not sexism but the absence of some innate capacity or interest on the part of (most) women. In other words, the dearth of women in tech is only natural. […] The proportion of programmers in India who are women is at least 30 percent. In the US it’s 21 percent. And this despite the fact that by most indexes - economic opportunity, educational attainment, health - women in India have access to a narrower set of opportunities than women in the United States. So unless nature is working contrarily in South Asia, something about the culture of the Indian educational system and tech industry is more hospitable to women than the American one. If we can figure out what that difference is, we can begin to change things for the better in the US."

See also: Overview of sources on the author’s website.

brucesterling:

*That’s harder to do than it looks.

 

My problem is none of this which I learnt makes any sense outside of my passport culture in which I do not reside. Sigh.

(Source: bollywoodisland)

"Reblog if you actually owned a walkman at some point in time"

(via beggerprince72)

It had tetris on it. Well, a tetris rip off that was a bit more fun. The screen was on the part that opened for you put the cassette in.

(via soelo)

Oh dear. But mine was made by Panasonic

(via soelo)

mrbasabose:

…by Claudy Khan… #Congo #Art

c’est moi, prepaid

mrbasabose:

…by Claudy Khan… #Congo #Art

c’est moi, prepaid

Noor Inayat Khan: the Spy Princess (1914-1944)

rejectedprincesses:

image

This week, we meet Noor Inayat Khan, one of the bravest women to ever live. She was a British secret agent during World War 2, working as a radio operator in occupied Paris. In fact, working as the ONLY radio operator in occupied Paris. The average lifespan for that job was 6 weeks, and she lasted almost 5 months. She escaped the Gestapo numerous times, and went out fighting. All this, even though everything about her work went against her basic pacifist nature. Read on for more about this phenomenal human being.

Read More

It should be added taht her father was Inayat Khan, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inayat_Khan

welcometothebunnyparade:

whorishgreen:

andreweliam:

sweeeetastea:

This is what it means to age gracefully…

God save the queen

i just cried

i remember being completely unable to comprehend that mary poppins and maria from the sound of music and the grandma from princess diaries were the same person cos in my child head mary poppins was a movie that had existed FOREVER so there was no way she wasnt crazy old looking

(Source: julieandrewsrules, via phirephoenix)

"Feminism is not about who opens the jar.

It is not about who pays for the date. It is not about who moves the couch. It is not about who kills the bugs. It is not about who cooks the dinner. It’s not even about who stays home with the kids, as long as the decision was made together, after thinking carefully about your situation and coming to an agreement that makes sense for your particular marriage and family.

It is about making sure that nobody ever has to do anything by “default” because of their gender. The stronger person should move the couch. The person who enjoys cooking more, has more time for it, and/or is better at it should do the cooking. Sometimes the stronger person is male, sometimes not. Sometimes the person who is best suited for cooking is female, sometimes not. You should do what works.

But it is also about letting people know that it is okay to change. If you’re a woman who wants to become stronger, that’s great. If you’re a man who wants to learn how to cook, that’s also great. You might start out with a relationship where the guy opens all the jars and the girl cooks all the meals, but you might find that you want to try something else. So try it."

4 ignorant delusions people have about feminism (via brutereason)

(via immlass)

lalage:

Happy lunar new year!
It is the year of the horse, one of my favorite animals ever. There is a really nice Arabic legend about the creation of the horse:
God made the horse from a handful of wind, and said: “I name you Horse; I make you Arabian and I make you the chestnut color of the ant. I hang happiness from the forelock between your eyes and you will be the lord of all other animals. Men shall follow you wherever you go: you will be as good for flight as for pursuit; you will fly across the earth even without wings; riches will be on your back and fortune will come through your meditation.”
I hope you have an awesome year

Forgot I’m a Fire Horse

lalage:

Happy lunar new year!

It is the year of the horse, one of my favorite animals ever. There is a really nice Arabic legend about the creation of the horse:

God made the horse from a handful of wind, and said: “I name you Horse; I make you Arabian and I make you the chestnut color of the ant. I hang happiness from the forelock between your eyes and you will be the lord of all other animals. Men shall follow you wherever you go: you will be as good for flight as for pursuit; you will fly across the earth even without wings; riches will be on your back and fortune will come through your meditation.”

I hope you have an awesome year

Forgot I’m a Fire Horse

(via phirephoenix)