I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
`My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away”.

PB Shelley, “Ozymandias”

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
`My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away”.

PB Shelley, “Ozymandias”

vintageindianclothing:

The Sari: 1910-1920

It’s kind of hard to pinpoint any pivotal moment in this decade. Except that the “jacket” was more or less commonplace amongst upper class women, even in Kerala where they not been common they appear in photographs. The Westernised blouses in this decade are Edwardian influenced and have shorter sleeves (though strictly this decade was post-Edwardian). Almost always the saris are richly embroidered or are zari bordered and the pallu draped over the head (except in South India).

Wearing shoes had been common for awhile amongst upper class women in India (though there was no requirement in India regarding shod feet) and they appear in a number of photographs in the decade.

In 1911 the Indian royals seem to have had photographs taken at various studios in London. Pic 1 is of the Rani (Queen) and Kumari (Miss/Princess) of Gondal (Gujarat). The blouses are more like cholis but the sleeves and high neck speak of far greater modesty than usual with a choli. The Kumari’s sari  looks a bit like chiffons seen in later decades whereas the Rani’s dress seems to be three part (the site mentions that the skirt has a chinai border made in Surat by Chinese embroiderers). Pic 2 is also taken in 1911 and is of Maharani Chimnabai who retained the nine yard style of wearing a sari. Her blouse is however of a Westenised type and while not averse to wearing shoes, it seems she was equally likely to throw them away in a London studio:). Pic 4 is of a Parsi lady in 1914, again the blouse is quite different from the Victorian influenced blouses seen in previous decades.  Similarly on this rather stylish lady at the end of the decade (pic 5, 1920) - that blouse looks fairly daring with its translucent overlay.

Pic 4 is of Kamala Nehru post her wedding, probably 1916. The double border style (i.e. the sari is wound twice around the waist) is seen much later so this looks a bit unusual. However, I don’t think full pleating was as common as it was in the next few decades now so it maybe due to this.

Notes: By the end of this decade there are a few hints of the momentary fashion of short saris and shoes. Mill cloth became more common after this decade thus changing the materials Indian women wore.  And in the first two decades of the 20th century, magazines and advertisements aimed at women started increasing which would no doubt have had some role in the dissemination of fashion.

Further Notes: There was a fair bit of criticism of the East-West fusion  that some of the fashions of the early decades entailed. Personally I think it a lot of it is rubbish and more often than not it is just women experimenting and having fun till they found a look that pleased them:)

Lafayette Studio Portraits here.

vintageindianclothing:

The Sari: 1921-1930

There are more than a few changes in the 1920s. For one, the number of royals getting themselves photographed seems to have substantially increased! It is the period of silent cinema and glamorous actresses like Patience Cooper, Miss Gohar and Ruby Meyers. There were more women in political life, more middle class women in the Arts.  There are as a result diverse photographs from the decade so I will cover a few.

At the beginning of the decade, the short sari and boots seems to have been a Thing and it was duly satirised by Gaganedranath Tagore in 1921 (pic 1). See also here. The whole brooch to fix sari to blouse and pallu on the head thing seems to have been on since at least the turn of the century, probably due to the burning question of “how the hell do I keep on this pallu!” with the nivi style. The style stayed on for a bit, Sarojini Naidu in 1929 (pic 2) still sports it. Also see here

One of the royals, Cooch Behar’s Indira (pic 5, year 1928) was responsible to a large extent for the “I want to be super classy in my Parisian chiffon saree and pearls look” and it was in the latter part of this decade that she wore it most often.  As the Motherland article puts it, it was a shift as significant as Chanel’s LBD and still remains a style statement (though perhaps more for ladies of a certain age:). In fact Bengal princesses were prone to do their own thing as in the 1927 photographs of the Burdwan princesses (pics 3 and 4) - can anyone id if those are lame saris? Jewellery is also pretty minimum and there is no brooch. As for the saris almost all seem to be chiffons with stitched zari borders. In this decade they are not as routinely heavy or ornate like in the 1930s (1925*, 1928). of course heavier tissue kind of saris of the previous decade (Pic 6 of Rani Amrit Kaur - also on the Gentlewoman cover) as well as the full sleeved blouse remained (pic 7 of Abida Sultan, also in this 1925 photograph).

Elsewhere, handlooms and simpler styles remained with regional variations. Rukmini Devi (seen here in pic 8 with her husband George Arundale) wears hers Tamil style - note pallu drape over the shoulder and the tucked in part akin to a nine yard. Similarly in pic 9 Nirmal Kumari Mahalanobis, who accompanied Tagore on many of his 1920s visits, wears her sari in a style common in Bengal in the early part of the 20th century. See also Santiniketan in 1925, Parsi women in 1925, at the 1929 Suffrage Alliance, 1925 Karachi and Calcutta, Lakshmi Sehgal as a teen and studio portraits 123 and 4).

Its hard to see the blouses given the way the pallu is draped but for the most part they seem to be simple with little of the lace or detail or embroidery of previous decades.

The pleats are not very clear to me in most of the 1920s pictures - unless the photographs are inverse, sometimes the pleats go the other way and sometimes they are barely there. In short, the way of pleating we are used to still seems to be in question.

Notes: I have covered the paintings of the 1920s in more than a few posts. See as an example the painters of the decade, MV Dhurandhar [X, X, X] Hemen Mazumdar [X, X, X] and Damerla Rama Rao [X, X]

*I could have sworn that border was 1930s but I am wrong. Tchah!

"How quietly we endure all that falls upon us."

— Khaled Hosseini, A Thousand Splendid Suns (via larmoyante)

(via blueberrybridges)

10000steps:

adenosinetriesphosphate:

mrlapadite:

The “Reflection” series of older people looking at their younger selves in mirrors.

Always reblog.

always cry

(via quietstorm1234)

"

It is difficult to be sat on all day, every day, by some other creature, without forming an opinion on them.

On the other hand, it is perfectly possible to sit all day, every day, on top of another creature and not have the slightest thought about them whatsoever.

"

Douglas Adams

this quote was literally in my sociology book 

(via marinashutup)

NAILED IT

(via applejackismyhomegirl)

That quote might be about dogs.

(via bluishorange)

(via bluishorange)

sourcedumal:

spokenelle:

Just a few highlights from the #BeAMan hashtag I began tonight on twitter. Inspired by this video by The Representation Project about the burden of masculinity on boys. Come join the discussion! 

All this.

(via transformdh)

"I hope that one day you will have the experience of doing something you do not understand for someone you love."

— Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (via larmoyante)

(via blueberrybridges)

"Whoever cannot seek
the unforseen sees nothing,
for the known way
is an impasse."

— Heraclitus (via ubu507)

oliviawhen:

Sometimes I wonder what it’d be like to turn to a life of crime. Probably the same.

(via immlass)

"Excellence is never an accident. It is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, and intelligent execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives - choice, not chance, determines your destiny."

Aristotle (via thephilosopherinparadise)

(Source: creatingaquietmind, via seensawscene)

     No one before Bernini had managed to make marble so carnal. In his nimble hands it would flatter and stream, quiver and sweat. His figures weep and shout, their torses twist and run, and arch themselves in spasms of intense sensation. He could, like an alchemist, change one material into another - marble into trees, leaves, hair, and, of course, flesh.  
     -   Simon Schama’s Power of Art. Bernini

(Source: cressus, via immlass)

medievalistsnet:

Star Wars and the Middle Ages